Forged Split Cross



Add two twists and viola!

The history behind this cross goes back to the days of the knights in shining armour era in england. A blacksmith from america went to Englad in the early 1970's and either did or participated in an archaeoligical dig in an ancient blacksmith shop. He found one of these on his trip buried in the floor from were it had been dropped or discarded and eventually covered with dirt and coal dust. He brought it back, cleaned it up good and figured out it had been done from a an unfolding process from slits chiseled in the metal. The secret to the lost cross had been lost for nearly 600 years had been rediscovered and every blacksmith tries to teach younger blacksmiths the technique how to make this one piece cross so its never lost again. © 2014 creativeforgings.net





How to ...

step 1Start off with a piece of square stock. Length determines how big the resulting cross will be. Thickness determines how thick the cross will be. Cut a kerf down one face a little over ½ way down the stock. Rotate 90° and cut a second kerf from the opposite end. The amount of overlap will determine the size of the hole in the center of the cross. Cutting with a band saw is quick. Cutting with a chisel gives an interesting texture resembling rough wood.



after unbendingAfter making your kerfs (cuts) take another heat and split one kerf on a hot cut hardy. Start the final "twist/pull" by putting one end of the split stock in a vise and pull up on the free end to "unfold" the cross. Reheat and straighten and square-up on the anvil edge.



Add a hook and ... After unfolding the cross arms you might attach a hook. Hole in the cross can be used for a mounting screw. Note the texture on the cross. This comes from cutting the kerfs with a hot-cut chisel instead of using a bandsaw.




Measurements by John Bennett Artist Blacksmith

Split Cross Layout
Stock Size ¼" 38" ½" ¾" 1"
Long Cut 2" 2  58" 4" 5 ¼" 8"
Short Cut 1" 1  38" 2" 2 ¾" 4"
Drop 1" 1  38" 2" 2 ¾" 4"
Total Length 2 ¾" 3½" 5  38" 7"  10  58"



Other Variations


Troll's Cross
Gerald Boggs Troll Cross

Celtic Cross
looks like you make the cross described
above and drift the center diamond to a circle
Templar Cross
Templar Cross



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"We all do better when we all do better."
       - Paul Wellstone, US Senator from Minnesota (1944-2002)

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