Refractory Coatings

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Product Temp Rating Application

Satanite Refractory Mortar

This refractory mortar works great for sealing the Inswool/Kaowool fibers on the walls of your forge. It can also be used as a clay coating for developing "temper lines" (hamons) on your blades. You can also use it to coat your entire blade to aid in the reduction of scaling during the heat treating process.

  • 3,200° F temperature rating

Mix the Satanite to a thick paste...just keep adding water slowly until you get a pasty consistency that you can paint on with a paintbrush....roughly the consistency of sour cream. Spray the ceramic fiber insulation down using water with a hand sprayer to wet it lightly. Next, apply the Satanite to the wool using a paintbrush, covering all exposed wool surfaces. To cure it, you want to dry it slowly. First, let the forge sit for a few hours minimum to air dry a little, then fire up the forge just briefly and shut it down. Do this several times, allowing it to cool down in between and increasing the on-time with each subsequent cycle. You'll see water vapor evaporating the first few times you do this. Finally, fire it up and bring it up to full temp to fully cure it. You will probably want to apply at least two coats of Satanite in this manner...it's a little time consuming (do it over a couple of day period) but makes for a more robust coating. a 1/4" layer is a good thickness to shoot for. If you are going to apply ITC-100 over top of the Satanite, be sure to fully cure the Satanite first.

APG #36 Refractory Cement

This high temperature refractory mortar/cement is the stuff that the late Bob Engnath promotes on his website for clay coating blades as well as the material that Walley Hayes uses in his Katana making videos. We are now offering it in small quantities as an alternative to Satanite for clay coating.

  • 3,200° F temperature rating
  • Wet, High Strength, High Alumina Mortar

APG #36 comes premixed. You apply it to your blade directly from the can, you do not need to mix it with water (unless you just want it a little more thin). For storage, keep it in a cool airtight container, such as the one it came in. In addition, you can top up the container with water to keep the clay from drying out. Just pour off the water before your next use.

Bubble Alumina Refractory Coating

Highly flux resistant! This material works really well for coating an Inswool lined forge for protection against flux when forge welding. This is one of the most flux resistant coatings we have found to date!

  • 3,300° F temperature rating
  • 2.5# bag is enough to do the floor in a 12" vertical forge (38" recommended thickness)

Mix the Bubble alumina to a troweling consistency and trowel it in place onto dampened Inswool ceramic fiber blanket Let it dry for a few hours and then slowly fire up your forge to fully cure it. This is one of the most flux resistant coatings we have found, I'm sure you will be very pleased with it!

SairBond Refractory Mortar

This high alumina-silica refractory mortar is made for laying firebrick. Specifically, it's application is for thin joints (18" thick joint or less) between bricks. It is a dry, air-setting, high strength mortar.

  • 3,000° F temperature rating
  • Dry, high strength Silica-Alumina Mortar

Sairbond is a high strength air setting mortar for laying fire brick.

FOR TROWELED JOINTS: The water required is up to 2 ½ gallons (U.S.) (9.5 liters) of water per 100 lbs (45.4 kgs) of dry mortar.

FOR DIPPED JOINTS: Add approximately 3 ½ gallons (U.S.) (13.2 liters) of water per 100 lbs (45.4 Kgs). Too much water will reduce mortar strength.

Thin brick joints give best results. Each joint should be completely filled with mortar.

Ins-tuff Ceramic-Fiber Rigidizer

  • Collodial silica ceramic-fiber blanket rigidizer
  • An inorganic impregnant that can be brushed on refractory fiber materials, or other high temperature insulation surfaces.

Manufacturer's information directly from the bottle:

Handling Instructions

  • After air drying, Rigidizer provides a harder and resistant, but less resilient, surface on the material being treated.
  • Container should be tightly sealed upon completion of job.
  • Avoid freezing, but if it occurs, Rigidizer should be thawed thoroughly and remixed.
  • One gallon will cover an area approximately 50 sq. ft. with one brush coat.

Directions for Applying

  • Remove dirt, grease, and oil from area to be coated. For best results, surface should be rough or porous.
  • Stir Rigidizer thoroughly before use.
  • Allow Rigidizer to air dry at room temperature. If desired, drying time for thin application may be shortened by using slightly higher temperatures up to 150° F.
  • On some surfaces, two coats may be required to obtain desired hardness. Allow 4 hours between coats unless heat is applied to speed drying.
  • Rinse equipment thoroughly in water as soon as possible after application is complete.

Source: http://elliscustomknifeworks.hightemptools.com/faq.html#ITC-100

ITC-100: Refractory Coating for Forge Efficiency

ITC-100 is known for its ability to reduce fuel costs and help your forge reach higher temperatures in a quicker time frame. ITC-100 is also more impervious to flux than Satanite alone and can help prolong the lifetime of your forge lining.

 

How do I mix and apply ITC-100?
For ITC-100, the manufacturer recommends to mix it 2:1, so if you have a pint, mix it with a half pint of water. My experience, indicates that mixing it a little thinner is just as good if you are using Satanite as a basecoat first. Since you're using the Satanite as a protective coating, the ITC-100 doesn't need to serve this function. Mix it thin, and apply the coats evenly. Applying several thin coats is better than applying a single thick coat. You'll likely have some left over for future patching. Apply the ITC-100 over the Satanite only after the Satanite is fully cured. You can use ITC-100 alone without first applying Satanite, you will just need to use more of this material.

I purchased my ITC-100 a while ago and haven't used it yet. It is starting to dry out, is this a problem?
While most refractory materials come in dry form, ITC-100 comes partially pre-mixed in a clay consistency. If your ITC-100 is starting to dry out you can store it in an air tight container if you like. Just add water to get it back to its original consistency.

How much area will ITC-100 cover in a forge?
ITC-100 will cover 6 to 12 square feet per pint, or 3 to 6 square feet per half pint. If you apply a basecoat of Satanite to your forge first, you can get by with the larger number for square feet coverage. An additional benefit to doing this with Satanite first, is that Satanite is cheap and by building up a ¼” layer of Satanite over you Inswool liner before applying the ITC-100 your forge will be more robust.


Satanite


How do I mix and apply the Satanite?  Mix the Satanite to a thick paste...just keep adding water slowly until you get a pasty consistency that you can paint on with a paintbrush....roughly the consistency of sour cream. Spray the ceramic fiber insulation down using water with a hand sprayer to wet it lightly. Next, apply the Satanite to the wool using a paintbrush, covering all exposed wool surfaces. To cure it, you want to dry it slowly. First, let the forge sit for a few hours minimum to air dry a little, then fire up the forge just briefly and shut it down. Do this several times, allowing it to cool down in between and increasing the on-time with each subsequent cycle. You'll see water vapor evaporating the first few times you do this. Finally, fire it up and bring it up to full temp to fully cure it. You will probably want to apply at least two coats of Satanite in this manner...it's a little time consuming (do it over a couple of day period) but makes for a more robust coating. a 1/4" layer is a good thickness to shoot for. If you are going to apply ITC-100 over top of the Satanite, be sure to fully cure the Satanite first.

ITC-100 Forge Refractory Coating

Invented by Feriz Delkic, founder of International Technical Ceramics, ITC-100 has been been used by the ceramics industry for over 25 years. This versatile high temperature ceramic coating can be applied to a variety of gas forge materials: ceramic fiber blanket, fiber board, refractory brick and castable refractories.

In the blacksmithing and bladesmithing world, those who have used ITC-100 in their forges swear by it's value. Most homemade forges cannot reach forge-welding heat without an application of ITC-100.

  1. Efficiency
    ITC-100 increases a forge's fuel efficiency 30 percent by reflecting 98 percent of the forge's infrared radiation.
  2. Safety
    ITC-100 protects against respirable silica. Refractory materials like Kaowool begin to break down at 1800 degrees F. releasing a form of respirable silica known as cristobalite. When applied to fiber blanket and cured, ITC-100 eliminates this problem.
  3. Durabilty
    ITC-100 coats the ceramic fiber blanket forming a protective shell in the forge interior,greatly extending the life of the insulation.

Alumina Kiln Shelves

For what it's worth, my forge floor is a chunk of alumina kiln shelf from a pottery supplier. It's stood up well to all the abuse I've subjected it to, including various kinds of molten-metal spill and a bit of flux. http://www.craftkb.com/Uwe/Forum.aspx/blacksmithing/802/Repost-about-rigidizer

Repair

If you want to keep your forge's interior in prime condition, it's best to repair those inevitable “oops” right after they occur. Just a dab will do as soon as the forge is cool enough to safely reach inside.

Description

ITC-100 HT Ceramic Coating is a versatile high temperature coating that has proven to achieve outstanding energy savings and refractory protection. Use it alone or as a base coat for other ITC products. It is used as a covering for ceramic fiber insulation or castable refractory. This material reflects radiant heat back into the furnace or forge to achieve high temperatures quickly and efficiently.

How To Use It

ITC-100 HT Ceramic Coating: Preparation: Prepare the surface by removing all loose and weakened fiber, bricks, debris, particles, dust and grease from interior walls, door, crown, floor and grooves behind electrical elements. Immediately before applying ITC 100, dampen these areas by spraying lightly with water. Mixing: Mix to one pint of ITC 100 1/2 pint of water and mix well. Applying: Spraying is the best method of application. For small applications a brush can be used. Coverage: A gallon will cover 50 to 100 square feet, and a pint will cover approximately 6 to 12 square feet.

ITC Problem Solving and Application Chart - Forge and Blacksmith

Repair and maintain refractory fiber, castables and brick forge linings ITC-100, 200
Seal refractory fiber blanket and increase infrared reflectance ITC-100, 296A
Repair and protect burner nozzles and tuyeres ITC-213, 296A
Protect metal ladles, skimmers and pipe crucibles ITC-213, 100, 296A
Coat parts for heat treating ITC-213, 100
Prevent oxidation of exotic metals ITC-213
WARNING: Do NOT apply any surface coatings, such as ITC-100 or ITC-100 coated ceramic fiber blankets over refractory cement until the refractory cement has been cured and fired. Sealing the cement surface before it has been fully fired once has caused steam explosions!!






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